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“19 – MAPLE LEAF RESERVOIR – 11″

UNIPRO is Now Restoring the 1911 Maple Leaf Reservoir Pump House

This historical one-story brick building is located beyond the southern end of the Maple Leaf Reservoir at NE 82nd St. Seattle, WA .   Measuring 26 feet by 40 feet, the construction of this Classical Revival design small building was completed in the year 1911.  (See Photos Below)

Set on a high brick base over a concrete foundation, the rectangular plan structure features a hipped roof lined with an elaborate terra cotta cornice adorned with solid modillion blocks and corners embellished with fluted terra cotta pilasters.  An intermediate cornice above the brick base appears to visually support the corner pilasters.

On the principal south elevation, two large window openings with terra cotta surrounds have been infilled with concrete and flank a center entrance covered by a small projecting pediment.  Square engaged terra cotta columns on either side of the entrance opening support the pediment’s entablature containing an incised sign, which reads “19 – MAPLE LEAF RESERVOIR – 11.”

A semi-circular fanlight covered with a decorative metal grille is set above the modern double entrance doors, accessed by a few concrete steps.  The west elevation has a single large window opening at the center, which has also been infilled with concrete.  On the north elevation, there are two infilled window openings.  The east elevation has two openings, one containing a modern door and the other a window, which has been infilled as well.

In addition to the extensive alterations, the light buff brick is severely pitted and pock marked in places, especially on the north elevation, and the terra cotta trim detail is cracked, deteriorated, and broken off in places.  UNIPRO is removing several damaged pieces of the original terra cotta and replacing them with new casts.  One corner piece alone is estimated to weight around 500 pounds.

 

UNIPRO is very proud to be working with Biwell Construction, Inc., the City of Seattle/Seattle Public Utilities and Bola Architecture.